Rainbow-Ones & Rainbow-Fives

These conventions apply to variants with rainbow-ones or rainbow-fives.


Color Promise#

  • When giving a color clue to a rainbow-one or a rainbow-five, you are expected to use the color that matches the card.
  • There are some exceptions, which are listed below.

The Color Play Clue Lie#

  • First, see the section on the Pink Play Clue Lie (for pink variants).
  • Similar to how the Pink Play Clue Lie violates Pink Promise, you can do a Color Play Clue Lie to violate Color Promise in the same way.
  • In other words, you can break Color Promise if:
    • using a "wrong" color would get extra cards (e.g. a 2-for-1 instead of a 1-for-1)
    • the card would play immediately or very soon
    • no-one else would be confused
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • The variant is "Rainbow-Ones (6 Suits)".
    • It is the first turn and nothing is played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues red to Bob, touching a blue 1 on slot 1 and a red 3 on slot 2.
    • Bob assumes that it is red 1 and plays it. It is instead the blue 1 and it successfully plays.
    • Bob reasons that Alice lied about the color identity of the 1 so that she could "get" the card on his slot 2 "for free".

The Color Promise Finesse#

  • First, see the section on the Color Play Clue Lie.
  • Usually, when Color Promise is violated, it is a Color Play Clue Lie. But what if Color Promise is violated and the clue is only a 1-for-1? The clue giver must be trying to communicate something extra.
  • In this situation, the next player should blind-play their Finesse Position card as a Color Promise Finesse.
  • For example, in 3-player game:
    • The variant is "Rainbow-Ones (6 Suits)".
    • It is the first turn and nothing is played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues red to Cathy, touching a blue 1 on slot 1.
    • Bob sees that Cathy's hand has no other blue cards in it, so there is no good reason why Alice could not have just clued blue to Cathy and satisfied Color Promise. Alice must be trying to communicate something extra.
    • Bob knows that this is a Color Promise Finesse and blind-plays his finesse position. It is a red 1 and it successfully plays.
    • Cathy knows that Alice performed a Finesse and that Cathy must have the red 2 that connects to the red 1 that was blind-played.
    • Cathy plays the red card and it is blue 1. It successfully plays.
    • Cathy now knows that Alice performed a Color Promise Finesse instead of a normal Finesse.
  • Note that the Color Promise Finesse can only be performed if the card that is blind-played connects to the clue that was given. Otherwise, Cathy will think that a Bluff happened and will not play the clued card.

The Color Prompt Exception (for Rainbow-Ones)#

  • First, see the section on the Pink Prompt Rank Exception (for pink variants).
  • Similar to how there is a Pink Prompt Rank Exception for pink cards, there is also a Color Prompt Exception for rainbow-ones.
  • In other words, cards in a player's hand that are clued with a single color clue are not treated to be a potential 1.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Bob's slot 2 card has a blue clue on it (and no other positive or negative clues).
    • Alice clues red to Cathy, touching a red 2 as a Play Clue.
    • Bob knows that if the green card in his hand is red 1, then this would be a Prompt.
    • Bob knows that if the green card in his hand is not red 1, then this would be a Finesse.
    • Bob knows that normally, Prompts are supposed to take precedence over Finesses. However, in this case, since his green card only has a single color clue on it, the Color Prompt Exception applies, so he should assume a finesse.
    • Bob blind-plays his Finesse Position card. It is a red 1 and it successfully plays.