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Null

These conventions apply to any variant with a null (touched by no clues) suit.


Hard Variant

  • Any variant with a null suit is treated as a Hard Variant, meaning that Loaded Play Clues are "turned on" and so forth.

Positional Clues

Since null cards cannot be clued directly, we agree that we should use Positional Clues to "get" them.

1) What is a Positional Clue?

  • Positional Clues correspond to a slot number.
  • A number positional clue corresponds directly to the slot number.
    • For example, a number 3 clue equals slot 3.
    • In a 4-player, 5-player game, or 6-player game a number 5 clue equals Chop Move (since there is no slot 5 card).
  • A color positional clue corresponds to a slot number that is based on the order of the stacks. Stacks correspond to the slot numbers from right to left.
    • For example, in a 3-player game of the Null (6 Suit) variant, there are 5 color clues and 5 slots in the hand. Thus, a purple clue equals slot 5 (since it is the right-most color), a blue clue equals slot 4 (since it is the 2nd right-most color), and so forth.
    • More examples for Color Positional Clues are listed below in a separate section. (Color Positional Clues have a dedicated section since they are a bit more complicated.)

2) How do you perform a Positional Clue?

  • Any "nonsense" clue (e.g. a clue that has no normal conventional interpretation) is to be interpreted as a Positional Clue instead.
  • Furthermore, in order to make it easier to perform Positional Clues, we also "turn off" the following conventions:
    • Double Finesses or Triple Finesses where the very next player has to blind-play two or more cards
    • Double Bluffs or Triple Bluffs
    • Ejections
    • Discharges
    • Charms
    • Ignitions
    • Self Color Bluffs
    • 5 Pulls
    • Trash Pulls
    • Trash Pushes
    • Critical Color Bluffs
    • Finesses and Bluffs that were initiated with a rank clue when a Free Choice was available between rank and color
  • Any clue that looks like one of these conventions is to be interpreted as a Positional Clue instead:

3) Are Positional Clues a Save Clue or a Play Clue?

  • A Positional Clue can be either a Save Clue or a Play Clue:
    • If the slot corresponds to the chop of a player, then they have to respect that it could be a Save Clue. In other words, it could be a 2 Save on a null 2, a 5 Save on a null 5, or a save on a critical null 3 or null 4 (if the other copy is in the trash).
    • If the slot corresponds to a slot that is not on the chop, then it is a Play Clue.
    • However, Loaded Play Clues always apply to Positional Clues, even in the Early Game. (This means that you cannot ever give a Positional Save Clue to a player that has one or more known-playable cards.)

4) What about if all the Null cards are already played?

  • Positional Clues are "turned off" once all of the null cards have been played. Once that happens, Double Finesses, Ejections, and so forth are turned back on.

5) Do I discard cards touched as a Positional Clue?

  • Good Touch Principle applies to cards touched with a Positional Clue in the same way that normal clues are.
  • Thus, if a trash card is used as part of a Positional Clue, then a Fix Clue must be given to the trash card later on.

6) How about an example?

  • For example, in a 3-player null game:
    • On the first turn of the game, Alice clues Cathy about one 4.
    • Bob knows that normally, this would be a 4's Double Bluff. But Double Bluffs are turned off in variants with a null suit.
    • Bob instead knows that this is a Positional Clue, indicating that someone should play their slot 4 card.
    • Bob sees that Cathy's slot 4 card is not a null card, so he plays his slot 4 card as the null 1.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobCathy4

7) Do you have to be in Bluff Seat to give a Positional Clue?

  • Yes. You are only allowed to give a Positional Clue to the very next player.
  • The only exceptions is when it is an extraordinary situation or it is very obvious to the team what is going on.

Color Positional Clues

  • A color positional clue corresponds to a slot number that is based on the order of the stacks. Stacks correspond to the slot numbers from right to left.
    • For example, in a 3-player game of the Null (6 Suit) variant, there are 5 color clues and 5 slots in the hand. Thus, a purple clue equals slot 5 (since it is the right-most color), a blue clue equals slot 4 (since it is the 2nd right-most color), and so forth.AliceRedYellowGreenBluePurple
    • For example, in a 3-player game of the Null (5 Suit) variant, there are 4 color clues and 5 slots in the hand. Thus, a blue clue equals slot 5 (since it is the right-most color), a green clue equals slot 4 (since it is the 2nd right-most color), and so forth.AliceRedYellowGreenBlue

Color Positional Clues Skip Over Clued Cards

  • When players are determining which slot number the Color Positional Clue is talking about, they should always skip over any cards that have one or more positive clues on them.
  • For example, in a 3-player game of the "Null (5 Suits)" variant:
    • All the 1's are played on the stacks except for the null 1.
    • Bob hand is as follows, from newest to oldest: red 1, red 1, null 1, blue 1, blue 5
    • Bob's blue 5 has a number 5 clue on it. (It was clued with a 5 Save earlier on.)
    • Alice clues green to Cathy, touching a green 1.
    • Bob knows that normally, this would be an Unknown Trash Discharge. But all Discharges are "turned off" in null variants. Instead, this must be a Null Positional Clue.
    • Bob knows that if his hand was completely unclued, green would refer to slot 4, since there are 5 slots in the hand and green is the 2nd rightmost color. But since Bob's slot 5 card already has a clue on it, he should skip over that card. So this must be targeting his slot 3 (e.g. his 2nd rightmost unclued slot).
    • Bob blind-plays null 1 from slot 3.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobRedYellowGreenBlueCathy

Color Positional Clues Wrap Around

  • Color Positional Clues always "wrap around" to the oldest card. In other words, if they go "past" slot 1, then they would apply to slot 5 again.
  • For example, in a 3-player game of the "Null (5 Suits)" variant:
    • All the 1's are played on the stacks except for the null 1.
    • Bob hand is as follows, from newest to oldest: null 1, red 1, red 5, blue 5, green 5
    • All of Bob's 5's have a number 5 clue on them. (They were clued with a 5 Save earlier on.)
    • Alice clues red to Cathy, touching a red 1.
    • Bob knows that normally, this would be an Unknown Trash Discharge. But all Discharges are "turned off" in null variants. Instead, this must be a Null Positional Clue.
    • Bob knows that if his hand was completely unclued, red would refer to slot 2, since there are 5 slots in the hand and red is the 4th rightmost color. But since Bob's slot 3, slot 4, and slot 5 card already have a clue on it, he should skip over those cards.
    • This means that blue would target slot 2 and green would target slot 1. Yellow would target slot 2 again (because of the wraparound) and red would target slot 1.
    • Bob blind-plays null 1 from slot 1.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobGreenRedBlueYellowCathy

One-of-Each Colors Are Skipped

  • One-of-each colors are skipped over when finding the "rightmost color". This is because the right-most color is the most important color, and one-of-each colors are less likely to be around.
  • For example, in a 3-player game of the "Black & Null (6 Suits)" variant:
    • Everyone has 5 cards in their hand.
    • There are 5 possible colors: red, yellow, green, blue, and black.
    • Normally, the rightmost color would be black, meaning that black would be assigned to slot 5. But black is skipped over, so blue is assigned to slot 5.
    • Subsequently, green is assigned to slot 4, yellow is assigned to slot 3, and red is assigned to slot 2.
    • Black is then assigned to slot 1. (In a 4-player game with 4 cards in the hand, then black would wrap-around and be assigned to the oldest slot again.)
AliceBlackRedYellowGreenBlueBobRedYellowGreenBlueBlack

Null Saves

Some additional rules apply to Positional Clues that are intended to be Save Clues.

Relaxed 2 Saves

  • It is optional for players to give Save Clues to null 2's.
  • Thus, if a null 2 is discarded, players should not make any Elimination Notes for them.

No Early Null 3 or Null 4 Saves

  • It is considered illegal to perform any kind of Chop Move on a non-critical null 3 or a non-critical null 4.
    • This rule counts for both Positional Saves and normal Chop Moves (such as the 5's Chop Move).
  • Thus, when a player is Chop Moved early on for a null card, they can know for sure that it is either a null 2 or a null 5.

Positional Bluffs

  • Since Positional Clues can only be given in Bluff Seat, it is also possible to use a Positional Clue to get a non-null card.
  • This is a Positional Bluff, because Bob expects to be playing a null card.
  • Similar to a normal Bluff, a Positional Bluff only "gets" 1 card. No actual null cards are promised.

No Positional Finesses

  • Theoretically, it would be possible to do a Finesse with a Positional Clue. However, we explicitly disallow this.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Null 1 is played on the stacks.
    • Alice gives a Positional Clue, indicating that someone should play a null card from slot 4.
    • Bob sees that Cathy has a null 3 on her slot 4.
    • Bob plays his Finesse Position as a null 2 (into the null 3).
    • Bob misplays a red 5 and loses the game.
    • Bob realizes that the null 2 was actually on his slot 4.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobMisplays4MusthaveplayedCathy

The Scream Blind-Play (Blind-Playing Chop)

  • Sometimes, a player will have two critical cards in a row on chop. Usually, the team will work together to clue both of the cards. However, in variants with a null suit, it is sometimes difficult to do this.
  • In cases where one player needs to save two cards at once, they can perform a Scream Blind-Play by blind-playing their chop card. This is similar to a Scream Discard, except it Chop Moves two cards instead of one.
  • Just like the Scream Discard, the Scream Blind-Play is only to be used as a last resort.