Null

These conventions apply to any variant with a null (touched by no clues) suit.


Hard Variant#

  • Any variant with a null suit is treated as a Hard Variant, meaning that Loaded Play Clues are "turned on" and so forth.

Positional Clues#

Since null cards cannot be clued directly, we agree that we should use Positional Clues to "get" them.

1) What is a Positional Clue?#

  • Positional Clues correspond to a slot number.
  • A number positional clue corresponds directly to the slot number.
    • For example, a number 3 clue equals slot 3.
    • In a 4-player, 5-player game, or 6-player game a number 5 clue equals Chop Move (since there is no slot 5 card).
  • A color positional clue corresponds to a slot number that is based on the order of the stacks. Stacks correspond to the slot numbers from right to left.
    • For example, in a 3-player game of the Null (6 Suit) variant, there are 5 color clues and 5 slots in the hand. Thus, a purple clue equals slot 5 (since it is the right-most color), a blue clue equals slot 4 (since it is the 2nd right-most color), and so forth.
    • More examples for Color Positional Clues are listed below in a separate section. (Color Positional Clues have a dedicated section since they are a bit more complicated.)

2) How do you perform a Positional Clue?#

  • Any "nonsense" clue (e.g. a clue that has no normal conventional interpretation) is to be interpreted as a Positional Clue instead.
  • Furthermore, in order to make it easier to perform Positional Clues, we also "turn off" the following conventions:
    • Double Finesses or Triple Finesses where one player has to blind-play two or more cards
    • Double Bluffs or Triple Bluffs
    • Ejections
    • Discharges
    • Charms
    • Ignitions
    • Self Color Bluffs
    • 5 Pulls
    • Trash Pulls
    • Trash Pushes
    • Black 4 Bluffs (with black)
    • Finesses and Bluffs that were initiated with a rank clue when a Free Choice was available between rank and color
  • Any clue that looks like one of these conventions is to be interpreted as a Positional Clue instead:

3) Are Positional Clues a Save Clue or a Play Clue?#

  • A Positional Clue can be either a Save Clue or a Play Clue:
    • If the slot corresponds to the chop of a player, then they have to respect that it could be a Save Clue. In other words, it could be a 2 Save on a null 2, a 5 Save on a null 5, or a save on a critical null 3 or null 4 (if the other copy is in the trash).
    • If the slot corresponds to a slot that is not on the chop, then it is a Play Clue.
    • However, Loaded Play Clues always apply to Positional Clues, even in the Early Game. (This means that you cannot ever give a Positional Save Clue to a player that has one or more known-playable cards.)

4) What about if all the Null cards are already played?#

  • Positional Clues are "turned off" once all of the null cards have been played. Once that happens, Double Finesses, Ejections, and so forth are turned back on.

5) Do I discard cards touched as a Positional Clue?#

  • Good Touch Principle applies to cards touched with a Positional Clue in the same way that normal clues are.
  • Thus, if a trash card is used as part of a Positional Clue, then a Fix Clue must be given to the trash card later on.

6) How about an example?#

  • For example, in a 3-player null game:
    • On the first turn of the game, Alice clues Cathy about one 4.
    • Bob knows that normally, this would be a 4's Double Bluff. But Double Bluffs are turned off in variants with a null suit.
    • Bob instead knows that this is a Positional Clue, indicating that someone should play their slot 4 card.
    • Bob sees that Cathy's slot 4 card is not a null card, so he plays his slot 4 card as the null 1.

7) Do you have to be in Bluff Seat to give a Positional Clue?#

  • Yes. You are only allowed to give a Positional Clue to the very next player.
  • The only exceptions is when it is an extraordinary situation or it is very obvious to the team what is going on.

Color Positional Clues#

  • A color positional clue corresponds to a slot number that is based on the order of the stacks. Stacks correspond to the slot numbers from right to left.
    • For example, in a 3-player game of the Null (6 Suit) variant, there are 5 color clues and 5 slots in the hand. Thus, a purple clue equals slot 5 (since it is the right-most color), a blue clue equals slot 4 (since it is the 2nd right-most color), and so forth.
    • For example, in a 3-player game of the Null (5 Suit) variant, there are 4 color clues and 5 slots in the hand. Thus, a blue clue equals slot 5 (since it is the right-most color), a green clue equals slot 4 (since it is the 2nd right-most color), and so forth.

Color Positional Clues Skip Over Clued Cards#

  • When players are determining which slot number the Color Positional Clue is talking about, they should always skip over any cards that have one or more positive clues on them.
  • For example, in a 3-player game of the "Null (5 Suits)" variant:
    • All the 1's are played on the stacks except for the null 1.
    • Bob hand is as follows, from newest to oldest: red 1, red 1, null 1, blue 1, blue 5
    • Bob's blue 5 has a number 5 clue on it. (It was clued with a 5 Save earlier on.)
    • Alice clues green to Cathy, touching a green 1.
    • Bob knows that normally, this would be an Unknown Trash Discharge. But all Discharges are "turned off" in null variants. Instead, this must be a Null Positional Clue.
    • Bob knows that if his hand was completely unclued, green would refer to slot 4, since there are 5 slots in the hand and green is the 2nd rightmost color. But since Bob's slot 5 card already has a clue on it, he should skip over that card. So this must be targeting his slot 3 (e.g. his 2nd rightmost unclued slot).
    • Bob blind-plays null 1 from slot 3.

Color Positional Clues Wrap Around#

  • Color Positional Clues always "wrap around" to the oldest card. In other words, if they go "past" slot 1, then they would apply to slot 5 again.
  • For example, in a 3-player game of the "Null (5 Suits)" variant:
    • All the 1's are played on the stacks except for the null 1.
    • Bob hand is as follows, from newest to oldest: null 1, red 1, red 5, blue 5, green 5
    • All of Bob's 5's have a number 5 clue on them. (They were clued with a 5 Save earlier on.)
    • Alice clues red to Cathy, touching a red 1.
    • Bob knows that normally, this would be an Unknown Trash Discharge. But all Discharges are "turned off" in null variants. Instead, this must be a Null Positional Clue.
    • Bob knows that if his hand was completely unclued, red would refer to slot 2, since there are 5 slots in the hand and red is the 4th rightmost color. But since Bob's slot 3, slot 4, and slot 5 card already have a clue on it, he should skip over those cards.
    • This means that blue would target slot 2 and green would target slot 1. Yellow would target slot 2 again (because of the wraparound) and red would target slot 1.
    • Bob blind-plays null 1 from slot 1.

One-of-Each Colors Are Skipped#

  • One-of-each colors are skipped over when finding the "rightmost color". This is because the right-most color is the most important color, and one-of-each colors are less likely to be around.
  • For example, in a 3-player game of the "Black & Null (6 Suits)" variant:
    • Everyone has 5 cards in their hand.
    • There are 5 possible colors: red, yellow, green, blue, and black.
    • Normally, the rightmost color would be black, meaning that black would be assigned to slot 5. But black is skipped over, so blue is assigned to slot 5.
    • Subsequently, green is assigned to slot 4, yellow is assigned to slot 3, and red is assigned to slot 2.
    • Black is then assigned to slot 1. (In a 4-player game with 4 cards in the hand, then black would wrap-around and be assigned to the oldest slot again.)

Null Saves#

Some additional rules apply to Positional Clues that are intended to be Save Clues.

Relaxed 2 Saves#

  • It is optional for players to give Save Clues to null 2's.
  • Thus, if a null 2 is discarded, players should not make any Elimination Notes for them.

No Early Null 3 or Null 4 Saves#

  • It is considered illegal to perform any kind of Chop Move on a non-critical null 3 or a non-critical null 4.
    • This rule counts for both Positional Saves and normal Chop Moves (such as the 5's Chop Move).
  • Thus, when a player is Chop Moved early on for a null card, they can know for sure that it is either a null 2 or a null 5.

Positional Bluffs#

  • Since Positional Clues can only be given in Bluff Seat, it is also possible to use a Positional Clue to get a non-null card.
  • This is a Positional Bluff, because Bob expects to be playing a null card.
  • Similar to a normal Bluff, a Positional Bluff only "gets" 1 card. No actual null cards are promised.

No Positional Finesses#

  • Theoretically, it would be possible to do a Finesse with a Positional Clue. However, we explicitly disallow this.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Null 1 is played on the stacks.
    • Alice gives a Positional Clue, indicating that someone should play a null card from slot 3.
    • Bob sees that Cathy has a null 3 on her slot 3.
    • Bob plays his Finesse Position as a null 2 (into the null 3).
    • Bob misplays a red 5 and loses the game.
    • Bob realizes that the null 2 was actually on his slot 3.

The Scream Blind-Play (Blind-Playing Chop)#

  • Sometimes, a player will have two critical cards in a row on chop. Usually, the team will work together to clue both of the cards. However, in variants with a null suit, it is sometimes difficult to do this.
  • In cases where one player needs to save two cards at once, they can perform a Scream Blind-Play by blind-playing their chop card. This is similar to a Scream Discard, except it Chop Moves two cards instead of one.
  • Just like the Scream Discard, the Scream Blind-Play is only to be used as a last resort.