Variants with No Positive Clues

These conventions apply to the following variants:

  • Extremely Ambiguous (with color clues only)
  • Color Blind (with color clues only)
  • Number Blind (with number clues only)
  • Totally Blind
  • Cow & Pig
  • Duck

Special Move Summary#

  • If a clue is focusing a critical card on chop, then it is probably a Save Clue, as mentioned in the "Basic Conventions" section above.
  • If a clue is focusing a card that is not on chop, then it is a Play Clue, and the following table applies:
Type of ClueInterpretation
Any clue focusing a one-away cardA Finesse, a Transparent Bluff, or a Transparent Double Bluff
Any clue focusing a two-or-more-away 5An Ejection (similar to 5CE)
Any clue focusing a two-or-more-away 3A Discharge (because 3 means slot 3)
Any clue focusing a two-or-more-away 4A Charm (e.g. the 4th Finesse Position)
  • For more specific information, see each section below.

The Transparent Bluff#

  • Normally, you cannot perform a Bluff in variants without any positive information. This is because the blind-play will always look like it "connects" to the clue target.
  • However, the one exception to this is if a 5 blind-plays. Then, the clue receiver can know that it is a Bluff (because there is no card that connects to a 5).
  • In this situation, the clue receiver would mark their touched card as a one-away-from-playable card.

The Transparent Double Bluff#

  • Normally, you cannot perform a Bluff in variants without any positive information. This is because the blind-play will always look like it "connects" to the clue target.
  • However, it is possible to perform a Double Bluff by cluing any one-away-from-playable card and getting two non-connected cards to play.
  • For example, in a 4-player game of the Duck variant:
    • It is the first turn and nothing is played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues red to Donald, touching a red 2 as a Play Clue.
    • Bob tries to blind-play red 1 from his Finesse Position, but he instead blind-plays the blue 1.
    • Cathy sees that Donald will go on to misplay the red 2 as the blue 2. Thus, this must be a Double Bluff, so Cathy blind-plays her Finesse Position card. It is a green 1 and it successfully plays.
    • Donald knows that he cannot have the blue 2, or else Cathy would not have done anything special. Donald's card can be any one-away-from-playable card in the game.
  • Double Half-Bluffs are explicitly outlawed. In other words, the first blind-play from a Double Bluff must be completely unrelated to the card that was clued. (This is so that the clue-receiver will have more specific information.)

5 Ejection#

  • 5 Color Ejection is turned on in variants without any positive information, just like it is in any other variant.
  • Additionally, players can also perform 5 Number Ejection and it will generally work in the exact same way.
  • Thus, players should keep in mind that clues that cause Ejection might have been either a color clue or a number clue.

3 Discharge#

  • Unknown Trash Discharge is turned off in variants without any positive information.
  • Instead, 3 Discharge is turned on. In other words, a Play Clue focusing a two-or-more-away-from-playable 3 is a signal for the next player to play their Third Finesse Position.
  • Similar to 5 Ejection, 3 Discharge can be initiated with either a color clue or a number clue.
  • When all the 3's have been played or accounted for, Unknown Trash Discharge is turned back on.

4 Charm#

  • Charm is defined as a move that makes a player play their Fourth Finesse Position.
  • A Play Clue focusing a two-or-more-away-from-playable 4 is a signal for the next player to play their Fourth Finesse Position.
  • Similar to 5 Ejection, 4 Charm can be initiated with either a color clue or a number clue.