Duck

These conventions apply to the "Duck" variants.


Chop Saves#

  • All clues to chop are treated as Save Clues.

Relaxed 2 Saves#

  • It is optional for players to give Save Clues to 2's.
  • Thus, if a 2 is discarded, players should not make any Elimination Notes for them.

Inverted Tempo Clues#

  • Normally, if a Save Clue is given to two cards, and then the cards are re-touched, it is a Double Tempo Clue and both the cards should play from left to right, even if one of the cards was on chop.
  • In Duck, the older card should play first. (This is exactly the same thing as the Brown Inversion convention.)

Loaded Play Clues#

  • Loaded Play Clues are "turned on" in Duck variants. Furthermore, Loaded Play Clues are even turned on in the Early Game.

The Loaded Finesse#

  • In addition to the above rule, players are also not allowed to give a Save Clue to a someone if that someone has a playable card that could be clued instead.
  • If the chop card is clued in this scenario, it is instead treated a Chop-Focus Loaded Play Clue. However, the player receiving the clue will not know this, and will treat it as a normal Save Clue. Thus, a Loaded Play Clue given in this scenario must be a Loaded Finesse.
  • As an exception to the rule, players are allowed to give a Save Clue if the Play Clue would violate Good Touch Principle.

The 1's Promise#

  • Players must use the number 1 clue to clue 1's in a player's opening hand.
  • Thus, if a player gets a Play Clue that touches two cards, and then they play the left-most card and it is a 1, they can know that the other one is for-sure a 1 and should play it on the next turn.
  • If 3 or more 1's were clued with the original clue, then the play order should be from left to right.

The 1's Promise Play Lie#

  • Players can be tricked into playing cards by using the 1's Promise. For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Alice clues Bob about two cards on slot 1 and slot 2.
    • Bob plays slot 1. It is a red 1.
    • Bob knows that because of the *1's Promise, the card on his slot 2 must also be a 1.
    • When it gets to Bob's turn, Bob plays his slot 2, and it is a red 2 instead of a 1.
  • If there are additional cards in the hand that were touched by the original clue, then once the 1's Promise Play Lie is revealed, players should stop playing those cards.
  • For example, in 3-player game:
    • Alice clues Bob about three cards on slot 1, slot 2, and slot 3.
    • Bob plays slot 1. It is a red 1.
    • Bob knows that because of the 1's Promise, the cards on his slot 2 and slot 3 must also be a 1.
    • When it gets to Bob's turn, Bob plays his slot 2, and it is a red 2 instead of a 1.
    • Bob knows that his slot 3 card must be a red card. However, it is not necessarily the red 3, and is equally likely to be either a red 3, a red 4, or a red 5.

The 1's Promise Play Lie Finesse#

  • It is also possible to Finesse other players by using the 1's Promise.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Alice clues Bob about two cards on slot 1 and slot 2.
    • Bob plays slot 1. It is a red 1.
    • Bob knows that because of the 1's Promise, the card on his slot 2 must also be a 1.
    • Cathy sees that Bob was clued about a red 1 and a red 3 as a red clue. Cathy also sees that it was possible to give a "clean" number 1 clue to Bob to only get the red 1.
    • Cathy knows that Bob's clue choice was quite strange: because of the 1's Promise, Bob will misplay the red 3 when it gets to his turn. Thus, this must be a Finesse.
    • Cathy blind-plays her Finesse Position as red 2.

Advanced Conventions#