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Level 17 - Dupe Tech

Special Moves


The Duplicitous Value Clue

  • Normally, we do not give Play Clues to duplicated cards, as that would violate Good Touch Principle.
  • However, in some situations, it is possible to give a Play Clue to Bob and trick him into playing a duplicated card. If while doing so, the clue also picked up one or more other valuable cards, then this would be a Duplicitous Value Clue.
  • We agree that as long as this kind of clue meets Minimum Clue Value Principle (not counting the duplicated card itself), no further Prompts or blind-plays are called for - the point of the clue was to simply "lock in" a save on the valuable cards.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Red 2 and blue 2 are played on the stacks.
    • Alice holds a globally-known red 3.
    • Alice clues number 3 to Bob as a Play Clue, touching 2 cards.
    • Bob plays the focused 3, assuming that it is the blue 3. However, it is actually red 3, and it successfully plays on the stacks.
    • Although this was unexpected, the team sees that this was a Duplicitous Value Clue, since there is sufficient value in "locking in" a save on Bob's other 3.
    • Bob marks his other 3 as any useful 3. It is not promised to be playable. (Thus, no-one will think that it is a Prompt or a Finesse.)
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBob3Red 3plays3After Bob plays red 3....BobBlue 3Yellow 3Green 3Purple 3

The Duplicitous Blind-Play

  • First, see the section on the Duplicitous Value Clue.
  • In the Duplicitous Value Clue, a duplicated card is clued directly (in order to "get" some other cards). Similar to this, it is also possible to get a duplicated card to blind-play (in order to "get" some other cards). This is called a Duplicitous Blind-Play.
  • Duplicitous Blind-Plays function the same way as Duplicitous Value Clues in that as long as the clue meets Minimum Clue Value Principle, no further Prompts or blind-plays are called for.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Red 2 and blue 2 are played on the stacks.
    • Alice holds a globally-known red 3.
    • Alice clues blue to Cathy, touching a blue 4 as a Play Clue.
    • Bob blind-plays his Finesse Position, expecting it to be a blue 3 as a Finesse. Instead, it is a red 3, and successfully plays on the stacks.
    • Although this was unexpected, the team sees that this was a Duplicitous Blind-Play, since there is sufficient value in "locking in" a save on Cathy's blue 4.
    • The team knows that blue 4 is not promised to be playable. (Thus, no-one will think that it is a Prompt or a Finesse.)
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobred 3plays(f)Cathyblue 4After Bob blind-plays...CathyBlue 4Blue 5
  • Note that Duplicitous Blind-Plays can also be performed with certain Ejections, Discharges, and so on.

The Duplicitous Tempo Clue

  • First, see the section on the Duplicitous Value Clue and the Duplicitous Blind-Play.
  • In the Duplicitous Value Clue and the Duplicitous Blind-Play, one or more "extra" valuable cards are touched for later. But what if this type of move is performed, but no additional valuable cards were touched?
  • If a filled-in card is revealed as playable, the clue should retroactively be treated as a Tempo Clue. Thus, this type of clue is called a Duplicitous Tempo Clue.
  • Duplicitous Tempo Clues may or may not cause a Tempo Clue Chop Move. (The conditions for this are the same as a "normal" Tempo Clue.)
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Red 1, green 1, and blue 1 are played on the stacks.
    • Cathy holds a globally-known red 2.
    • Bob holds a previously-touched green 2, but its rank is not yet known.
    • Alice clues number 2 to Bob, touching one new card, and also "filling in" the green 2.
    • Bob knows that this is a Play Clue on the blue 2. He plays it, but it is actually a red 2, and successfully plays on the stacks.
    • Bob's first thought was that this was a Duplicitous Value Clue, but no other new cards were touched as part of the clue. Thus, Bob knows that this is a Duplicitous Tempo Clue instead.
    • Since Bob's green 2 was Promptable and Alice was not in a valid stalling situation, Bob treats this as a Tempo Clue Chop Move.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBob2Red 2plays2CathyAfter Bob plays red 2...Bobcm

The Assisted Trash Chop Move

  • First, see the section on the Trash Chop Move.
  • Trash Chop Moves can be very useful, but sometimes they can be "blocked" when there is no way to cleanly clue the known trash.
  • In this situation, the problem can be solved by using a Trash Bluff or an Unknown Trash Discharge to get a duplicated card to blind-play. This is called an Assisted Trash Chop Move.
  • Since no "extra" cards are touched as part of the move (like in an e.g. Duplicitous Value Clue), the point of the clue should be clear to the team: a Trash Chop Move on all cards to the right of the clued card(s).
  • For example, this is an Assisted Chop Move from a Trash Finesse in a 3-player game:
    • Blue 1 is played on the stacks.
    • Alice holds a globally-known yellow 1.
    • Alice clues number 1 to Cathy, touching a blue 1 in slot 3 as a Play Clue.
    • Bob knows that since the blue 1 was represented as a good 1, this must be a Trash Finesse, and Bob must have a red 1, a green 1, a yellow 1, or a purple 1 on his Finesse Position.
    • Bob blind-plays his Finesse Position. To his surprise, it is a yellow 1 and it successfully plays on the stacks.
    • Since yellow 1 was duplicated, the rest of the team knows that something unusual has happened. However, since no additional cards were touched as part of the clue, everyone knows that it was an Assisted Chop Move on Cathy. (In this case, Cathy should Chop Move slot 4 and slot 5.)
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobyellow 1plays(f)Cathy1Blue 1After Bob plays yellow 1...Cathyb1cmcm
  • For example, this is an Assisted Chop Move from an Unknown Trash Discharge in a 3-player game:
    • Blue 1 is played on the stacks.
    • Alice holds a globally-known yellow 1.
    • Alice clues blue to Cathy, touching a blue 1 in slot 2 as a Play Clue.
    • Bob knows that since blue 1 was represented as blue 2, this must be an Unknown Trash Discharge.
    • Bob blind-plays his Third Finesse Position. To his surprise, it is a yellow 1 and it successfully plays on the stacks.
    • Since yellow 1 was duplicated, the rest of the team knows that something unusual has happened. However, since no additional cards were touched as part of the clue, everyone knows that it was an Assisted Chop Move on Cathy. (In this case, Cathy should Chop Move slot 3, slot 4 and slot 5.)
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobYellow 1plays(f)CathyBlue 1After Bob discharges yellow 1...Cathyb1cmcmcm

The Time Travel Chop Move (Direct Form)

  • First, see the section on the Duplicitous Value Clue and the Duplicitous Blind-Play.
  • Normally, a Duplicitous Clue "gets" an extra card or "fills in" another card as a Tempo Clue. However, if a Duplicitous Clue is performed that does not accomplish either of these things, it must have been done for some other reason.
  • In this situation, after the duplication reveals itself, the clued player should interpret the clue as a Trash Chop Move on their own hand. (In other words, they should pretend like the duplicated card was clued directly as a Trash Chop Move.)
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • All of the 2s are played on the stacks.
    • Cathy holds a globally-known red 3.
    • Alice clues number 3 to Bob, touching a new 3 as a Play Clue.
    • Bob plays his 3, expecting it to be any 3 other than red. However, it is actually red 3, and successfully plays on the stacks.
    • Since this move was a 0-for-1 and did not provide tempo on any cards, everyone knows that this was a Time Travel Chop Move. Bob Chop Moves all the cards that were behind his red 3.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBob3Red 3playsCathyAfter Bob plays red 3...Bobcmcmcm

The Time Travel Chop Move (Blind-Play Form)

  • First, see the section on the Time Travel Chop Move (Direct Form).
  • Normally, a Time Travel Chop Move involves cluing the duplicated card directly. But what if the duplicated card is "blocked" with no way to cleanly clue it?
  • In this situation, players can cause the duplicated card to blind-play instead of cluing it directly, which should accomplish the same thing (i.e. the cards to the right of the duplicated card being Chop Moved). However, care has to be taken to ensure that the end result is truly "bad" enough to not be misinterpreted as another kind of clue.
  • Specifically:
    • The clue must not satisfy Minimum Clue Value Principle (similar to a Duplicitous Clue).
    • The clue must not look like an Assisted Trash Chop Move on the clue receiver.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • All of the 1s are played on the stacks. Cathy has a known blue 2.
    • Bob has a previously-clued red card in his hand, but does not know the rank of the card.
    • Alice clues number 3 to Bob, "filling in" the red card as the red 3. (The clue touches no other cards.)
    • Bob knows that this is a Finesse on the red 2 into the red 3. Bob blind-plays his Finesse Position, but it is a blue 2 instead of a red 2, which successfully plays on the stacks.
    • Since the move was a 0-for-1, Bob understands that he should Chop Move everything that was behind the blue 2 as a Time Travel Chop Move.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobBlue 2playsf3CathyAFter Bob blind-plays blue 2...Bobcmcmcm