Level 16 - Elimination

  • Level 16 strategies should only be learned if you have 280+ games of experience with the group.

Conventions#


Elimination & Elimination Notes#

  • Normally, your teammates would never let you discard anything important. So when you discard some playable card (or a needed 2) and that card is not in anyone else's hand, you might think that the team make a mistake.
  • From High Value Principle, you should never assume your teammates are making a mistake. One excellent reason that they would let you discard an important card is that you have the other copy in your hand. (In order to satisfy Good Touch Principle, they had to wait for you to discard it so that they would not duplicate the card.)
  • Thus, when you get a follow-up clue, you will know exactly what card it is.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Red 3 is played on the stacks.
    • Alice has a completely unclued hand.
    • Alice discards her chop (slot 5). It is a (playable) red 4.
    • Alice gasps in surprise - she knows that everyone on the team agrees to not let each other discard playable cards (Save Principle).
    • Alice knows that the team was not in a dire situation or anything, so the only explanation is that she must have the other copy of the red 4.
    • Alice writes a note of "r4?" on slots 2, 3, 4, and 5. (It can't be on slot 1, since that is the card she just drew.)
    • Bob clues Alice red, which touches a card on slot 1 and slot 2.
    • Normally, Alice would play the left-most card (slot 1) as the red 4. However, because of her notes, she knows that the red 4 must actually be on slot 2.
    • Alice successfully plays red 4 from slot 2. Since the red 5 is the only good red card left, Alice can assume that her other red card is red 5 (from Good Touch Principle), and she can play it on the next turn.
AliceAlice discards, it is Red 4Alice writes Elimination NotesAlicer4?r4?r4?r4?Alicer5r4?BobClue GiverClue GiverCathy
  • In this example, the "r4?" notes that Alice writes are called Elimination Notes. Elimination Notes are notes that represent the possible slots for a specific card.
  • In this example, the "thing" that triggered the writing of Elimination Notes was the discarding of a card, so this is called Discard Elimination.
  • Note that players should not always make Elimination Notes when they discard a playable card. In some cases, games can be extremely busy, leaving no reasonable way to get the playable card. Players must just their best judgment and account for this.

Double Discard Elimination#

  • When a player who is in a Double Discard situation discards anyway with an obvious clue to give (such as a 5 Stall), it implies that they see the other copy of the card, and were not Double Discarding at all.
  • Thus, when this occurs, you should write Elimination Notes on your entire hand for that card.
  • This is almost exactly the same thing as Discard Elimination, except it is triggered by the discard of a separate player.

2 Elimination#

  • According to Save Principle, everyone knows that all of the 2's must get saved. Thus, if someone else on the team lets a 2 get discarded, that is very strange.
  • If there is not anything special going on, then this should be a signal that someone else has the other copy of the 2, and should trigger the writing of Elimination Notes on their hand.

Special Moves#


The Elimination Blind-Play#

  • First, see the section on Elimination.
  • In the example for Discard Elimination, the team clued the second copy of the red 4 directly. But in other situations, the team will not need to clue anything. The player with the Elimination Notes can eliminate the possibilities one by one. When there is only one possibility left, they can blind-play the card as an Elimination Blind-Play.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Red 3 is played on the stacks.
    • Alice has a completely unclued hand.
    • Alice discards her chop (slot 5). It is a (playable) red 4.
    • Alice knows that the team was not in a dire situation or anything, so the only explanation is that she must have the other copy of the red 4.
    • Alice writes "r4?" Elimination Notes on slots 2, 3, 4, and 5. (It can't be on slot 1, since that is the card she just drew.)
    • Bob clues Alice blue, which touches slots 1, 2, 3, and 4. (This is a Play Clue on slot 1.)
    • Alice writes a note of "blue 1" on slot 1.
    • Alice erases her Elimination Notes for the red 4 from slots 2, 3, and 4.
    • The only card left with an Elimination Note is slot 5.
    • Alice can now blind-play the red 4 when it gets to her turn as an Elimination Blind-Play.
AliceAlice discards, it is Red 4Alice writes Elimination NotesAlicer4?r4?r4?r4?Alicer4?BobClue GiverClue GiverCathy

The Elimination Play Clue#

  • A clue that touches multiple cards only has one focus. As you probably know, if the chop card was not touched, then the focus is the left-most card.
  • However, this rule does not apply if a clue singles out a playable card from Elimination. In this case, the card is only focused on the Elimination card, and any other cards touched are not necessarily playable right now.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Red 1 and blue 1 are played on the stacks.
    • Alice has both red 2's in her hand on slot 3 and slot 5. (Alice's chop is her slot 5.)
    • Alice discards her chop, and it is revealed to be the red 2.
    • Alice is surprised, and writes Discard Elimination Notes for red 2 on slots 2, 3, 4, and 5.
    • Bob gives a number 2 clue to Alice that touches a card in slot 1 and slot 4.
    • Normally, Alice would treat this as a Play Clue on the 2 in her slot 1. However, she now knows that her slot 4 card is exactly red 2 (and that she can play it right now).
    • Thus, Alice knows that the point of the clue was only to get the red 2. The 2 in her slot 1 can be any 2 in the game and is not necessarily playable right now.
AliceAlice discards, it is Red 2Alice writes Elimination NotesAlicer2?r2?r2?r2?Alice2any 22r2?BobClue GiverClue GiverCathy

Interaction Between Elimination & Chop-Focus#

  • Sometimes, players will have two or more Elimination Notes on cards in their hand. These players can be given follow-up clues that single out the identity of the Elimination card.
  • Clues can single out the Elimination card using positive information or by using negative information.

Example of an Elimination Single-Out Using a Clue With Positive Information#

  • See the section on the Elimination Play Clue:
    • In the example for Elimination Play Clue, Alice receives a 2 clue.
    • After getting the 2 clue, Alice deletes the Elimination Notes on her slot 2, slot 3, and slot 5.
    • Thus, Alice has completely narrowed down the identity of the red 2 to be in slot 4.

Example of an Elimination Single-Out Using a Clue With Negative Information#

  • For example, in 3-player game:
    • Red 1 is played on the stacks.
    • Alice discards red 2. She writes Elimination Notes for red 2 on slot 2, slot 3, slot 4, and slot 5.
    • Bob clues number 3 to Alice, touching three 3's on slot 2, slot 3, and slot 4.
    • After getting the number 3 clue, Alice deletes the Elimination Notes on her slot 2, slot 3, and slot 4.
    • Thus, Alice has completely narrowed down the identity of the red 2 to be in slot 5.

Chop-Focus Happens Before Clues Are Given#

  • When a clue is given that singles out an Elimination card with negative information, then the focus of the clue should be evaluated normally.
  • In other words, the focused slot should be evaluated before the clue was given, just like how every other clue works.
  • For example, continuing on from the previous example:
    • Alice also knows that Bob's number 3 clue must be a Play Clue on the red 3 (since red 1 is on the only 1 currently played and there are no 3's in the trash).
    • But which slot is Bob's clue focusing? In other words, which slot is promised to be red 3?
    • The clue is either focused on slot 2 (the newest of the clued cards) or slot 4 (the "new" chop after the red 2 is accounted for).
    • Alice knows that you evaluate where the chop is before clues are given, so the clue must be focused on slot 2.
AliceAlice discards, it is Red 2Alice writes Elimination NotesAlicer2?r2?r2?r2?Alice3(R)33r2?BobClue GiverClue GiverCathy

The Elimination Riding Deduction#

  • If:
    • there are only two cards left in a player's hand with Elimination Notes and
    • the previous players let the chop card ride and
    • the previous players were not busy, then
  • The card with the Elimination Note card cannot be on the chop! (Otherwise, one of the previous players would have clued it with either a Play Clue or a Save Clue in order to prevent it from being discarded.)
  • In such a situation, the player with the Elimination Notes can "jump ahead" and immediately blind-play the newest of the two cards.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Red 1 has been played on the red stack.
    • Alice has a completely unclued hand.
    • Alice discards her chop (slot 5). It is a (playable) red 2.
    • Alice knows that the team was not busy, so she must have the other copy of red 2.
    • Alice writes Elimination Notes on slots 2, 3, 4, and 5.
    • Alice receives no clues on the next go-around of the table. She discards, and now has Elimination Notes on slots 3, 4, and 5.
    • Alice receives no clues on the next go-around of the table. She discards, and now has Elimination Notes on slots 4 and 5.
    • Alice receives no clues on the next go-around of the table. Her teammates would not let the other copy of red 2 be discarded, so it must be on slot 4. Alice blind-plays red 2 from slot 4.
AliceAlice discards, it is Red 2Alice writes Elimination NotesAlicer2?r2?r2?r2?None gives a clue to Alice, she discards againAlicer2?r2?r2?None gives a clue to Alice, she discards againAlicer2?r2?None gives a clue to AliceThe team would not let her discard Red 2So Red 2 must be on slot 4

The Riding Bluff#

  • Typically, when a player has two cards with Elimination Notes and the "true" copy of the card is on chop, you must clue it to let them know.
  • However, if the other card is also playable, you can choose to not clue anything.
  • Next, the player should perform an Elimination Riding Deduction, and play the unrelated card.
  • After that, there will be only one card left with an Elimination Note, so they will go on to play the "true" card on their next turn.

The Elimination Self-Chop Move#

  • Sometimes, you will have narrowed down your Elimination Notes to one specific card. Thus, even though the card has no positive clues on it, you know the exact identity of the card.
  • If the card in question is on your chop and the card is not yet playable and you need to discard, you should obviously not discard the important elimination card. You should instead self-chop move and discard the next thing.

The Elimination Finesse#

  • Normally, if a player is Finessed, they are supposed to play their Finesse Position card. However, what if they have Elimination Notes on their hand for the specific card that is Finessed?
  • In most situations, there will not be an Elimination Note on slot 1 (e.g. the Finesse Position). This means that playing slot 1 into the Finesse would not make any sense.
    • However, in the rare case where there is an Elimination Note on their Finesse Position, then the player should still not play the Finesse Position; read on.
  • Here, the player is expected to play the oldest of the cards with the Elimination Notes on them (not counting Chop Moved cards, if any).
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Blue 2 is played on the stacks.
    • Alice has a completely unclued hand.
    • Alice discards a blue 3. Blue 3 was playable, and nothing urgent is currently happening, so she writes Elimination Notes on her hand for the other blue 3 on slots 2, 3, 4, and 5.
    • Bob clues Cathy blue, which touches a blue 4 as a Play Clue.
    • Cathy discards.
    • Alice knows that this is some sort of Reverse Finesse, as it is calling for the blue 3. However, the blue 3 cannot be in her Finesse Position (slot 1), as she knows from the Elimination Notes that it must be either on slot 2, 3, 4, or 5. So it must instead be a Reverse Elimination Finesse.
    • The Elimination Finesse promises that it is her oldest card, so she plays slot 5 as blue 3.
AliceAlice discards, it is Blue 3Alice writes Elimination NotesAliceb3?b3?b3?b3?Aliceb3?BobClue GiverClue GiverCathyBlue 4
  • As mentioned above, Chop Moved cards should be skipped over when finding the Elimination Finesse target. If there are two or more cards with Elimination Notes on them and they are all Chop Moved, then the oldest Chop Moved card should be played.
  • Elimination Finesses apply to all types of situations with Elimination Notes (including Double Discard Elimination Notes). Subsequently, you can more specifically describe an Elimination Finesse as a Discard Elimination Finesse or a Double Discard Elimination Finesse.
  • Note that normal Finesses take priority over Self-Elimination Finesses. For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Red 2 and blue 2 are played on the stacks.
    • Alice's hand is completely unclued. Alice has Elimination Notes on slot 3 and slot 4 for red 3.
    • Cathy clues a number 4 in Alice's slot 1 as a Self-Finesse.
    • If Alice's 4 is a blue 4, then this would be a normal Self-Finesse, and Alice should blind-play blue 3 from slot 2.
    • If Alice's 4 is a red 4, then this would be an Elimination Self-Finesse, and Alice should blind-play red 3 from slot 4.
    • Alice knows that in this situation, you always supposed to assume a normal Finesse, so she blind-plays blue 3 from slot 2.
Alice4Blue 3r3?r3?BobCathyClue GiverClue Giver

Trash Touch Elimination#

  • After deciding on the target of a clue, players carefully choose between using a color clue and a number clue in order to avoid violating Good Touch Principle with the ancillary cards that will be touched (since every clued card is treated as a card that will eventually be played). Sometimes, when both a color clue and a number would violate Good Touch Principle, players are forced to pick between the lesser of two evils.
  • However, sometimes you can see that it is possible to use a color or number clue to uniquely touch a clue target without "picking up" extra bad cards. So, when extra bad cards are deliberately touched in this way, it is conveying an extra special message.
  • When this occurs and there is exactly one "missing" card, players should write an Elimination Note in their hand for the missing card. This is called Trash Touch Elimination.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Red 3 is played on the stacks. All of the other suits have the 1 played on the stacks.
    • Bob's hand is, from newest to oldest: red 4, red 1, blue 1, green 1, yellow 1.
    • Alice wants to give a play clue to the red 4. Everyone else on the team (other than Bob) can see that she can give either number 4 or red.
      • If Alice clues number 4, then it will uniquely touch the red 4 (which will satisfy Good Touch Principle).
      • If Alice clues red, then it will touch the red 4 and the red 1 (which will violate Good Touch Principle).
    • Alice clues red to Bob. Since nothing was stopping her from cluing number 4, this is very strange.
    • Bob plays the red 4.
    • There is only one "missing" red card - the red 5. Cathy knows that normally, Bob would think that his red 1 is the red 5 (from Good Touch Principle). This must mean that Cathy has the red 5. Cathy writes Trash Touch Elimination Notes on her hand for the red 5.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobRed 4Red 1Blue 1Green 1Yellow 1Cathyr5?r5?r5?r5?