Level 15 - Ejections & Discharges

  • Level 15 strategies should only be learned if you have 260+ games of experience with the group.

Conventions#


Ejections#

  • Ejection refers to a move like a Bluff, but instead of playing an unrelated card from Finesse Position, someone plays an unrelated card from their Second Finesse Position. For example, if a player's hand is completely unclued, their Second Finesse Position is slot 2.
  • Just like a Bluff, an Ejection can only be performed on the very next player.
  • Several different kinds of moves can cause an Ejection. The most common one is the 5 Color Ejection.

Discharges#

  • Discharge is similar to Ejection, except instead of blind-playing the Second Finesse Position card, the player plays the Third Finesse Position card.
  • Just like a Bluff, a Discharge can only be performed on the very next player.
  • Several different kinds of moves can cause a Discharge. The most common one is the Unknown Trash Discharge.

Special Moves#


The 5 Color Ejection (5CE)#

  • Normally, if a player gives a color Play Clue to a 5, it would mean that it is a Finesse on the 5 and all of the cards leading up to the 5 are playable.
  • If the very next player sees that they will only have to blind-play one card in their hand to fulfill the Finesse, then they should assume that it is a Finesse and blind-play their Finesse Position.
  • If the very next player sees that they would have to blind-play two or more cards in their hand to fulfill the Finesse, then a Finesse is unlikely. Instead, players agree that this signals an Ejection and that the next player should play their Second Finesse Position.
    • Prompts don't factor into the "two or more blind-plays" rule. Players only count the number of blind-plays.
  • After the blind-play, the player who received the clue will know that they must have a 5.
  • Note that 5 Color Ejection only applies if the 5 did not have any clues on it already. If a 5 is re-clued, it signals a Finesse on all of the cards leading up to the 5.
    • However, the "invisible" clue from a Chop Move does not count. In other words, you can perform a 5 Color Ejection with a Chop Moved 5, as long as the card does not have any positive clues on it.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • It is the first turn and nothing is played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues red to Cathy, touching a red 5 on slot 3.
    • Bob knows that normally, this would be a Finesse on the 5, indicating to Bob that he has the red 1, the red 2, the red 3, and the red 4. However, since this calls for more than one blind card, he knows that 5 Color Ejection should take precedence, so he knows to play his Second Finesse Position card. It is a red 1 and it successfully plays.
    • From Cathy's perspective, if Bob had played his Finesse Position card in response to the red clue, then Cathy would know that it was a Finesse or a Bluff. But since Bob blind-played his Second Finesse Position card, it must be a 5 Color Ejection. Cathy marks the red card as red 5.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobRed 1Cathy(5)After Bob blind plays red 1...CathyRed 5
  • In the previous example, a 5 Color Ejection was preformed with the 5 being the only brand new card introduced with the color clue. However, it is also possible to perform a 5 Color Ejection with more than one card introduced. Normally, this kind of thing would signal an Out-of-Order Finesse, but the 5 Color Ejection interpretation should take precedence as long as the next player would have to blind-play two or more cards.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • It is the first turn and nothing is played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues red to Cathy, touching a red 5 on slot 2 and a red 2 on slot 3.
    • Bob knows that normally, this would be an Out-of-Order Finesse on the 5, indicating to Bob that he has the red 1, the red 3, and the red 4. However, since this calls for more than one blind card, he knows that 5 Color Ejection should take precedence, so he knows to play his Second Finesse Position card. It is a red 1 and it successfully plays.
    • From Cathy's perspective, if Bob had played his Finesse Position card in response to the red clue, then Cathy would know that it was a Finesse or a Bluff. But since Bob blind-played his Second Finesse Position card, it must be a 5 Color Ejection. Cathy marks the red card as red 5. Her other red card can be red 2, red 3, or red 4.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobRed 1Cathy(5)(2)After Bob blind plays red 1...CathyRed 5Red 2Red 3Red 4

The Unknown Trash Discharge (1-for-1 Form) (UTD)#

  • In general, Bluffs work because the blind-play tells the person who was clued that they have a one-away-from-playable card of that color.
  • In general, Trash Bluffs work because the blind-play tells the person who was clued that they have a trash card.
  • Players must be careful to not give a Trash Bluff that looks like a Bluff - that will desynchronize the team.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • All the 1's are played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues red to Cathy, touching a red 1 as a Play Clue.
    • Bob blind-plays his Finesse Position and it successfully plays as blue 2.
    • Cathy knows that a Bluff has occurred and marks her red card as red 3 (the one-away-from-playable red card).
    • Of course, this is not true, because Cathy's red card is actually a red 1. The team will likely get a misplay at some point in the future.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobBlue 2Cathy(1)After Bob blind plays blue 2...CathyBombs!Red 3(1)Illegal!
  • If the above example happens and Alice is not making a mistake, then Alice must be trying to communicate something extra. This should signal an Discharge on the very next player.
  • Since the Third Finesse Position card was played instead of the Finesse Position card, then the player who received the clue will know that the card is trash.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • All the 1's are played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues red to Cathy, touching a red 1 as a Play Clue.
    • Bob knows that if he played his First Finesse Position, then Cathy would write a note of red 3 on the card (as a Bluff), which would be a Lie.
    • Bob knows that if he played his Second Finesse Position, then Cathy would write a note of red 5 on the card (as a 5 Color Ejection), which would be a Lie.
    • Bob blind-plays his Third Finesse Position. It is a blue 2 and it successfully plays.
    • Cathy knows that a Discharge has occurred from Alice's red clue. This must be an Unknown Trash Discharge, so the focus of the clue must be trash.
    • Cathy marks her red card as a red 1 (since that is the only possible trash red card) and discards it.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobBlue 2Cathy(1)After Bob blind plays blue 2...CathyTrash
  • In summary:
    • For a Trash Bluff:
      • The empathy on the clued card only contains possibilities that are Playable, Delayed Playable, or trash.
      • Thus, a normal blind-play is enough to prove it is trash.
    • For an Unknown Trash Discharge:
      • The empathy on the clued card contains one or more possibilities that are useful and currently unplayable.
      • Thus, something extra is needed to prove it is trash.
    • Other than this, don't use more complicated factors to prefer a Trash Bluff over an Unknown Trash Discharge (like Bob having to wait on some other card).

The Unknown Trash Discharge (2-for-1 Form) (UTD)#

  • When multiple cards are clued with an Unknown Trash Discharge, only the focus of the clue is considered to be trash. This means that Good Touch Principle applies to the non-focused cards.
  • Note that this is the opposite of the Trash Bluff. (In a Trash Bluff, when multiple cards are clued, all of the touched cards are considered to be trash.)
  • This means that while most Unknown Trash Discharges are 1-for-1 clues, you can also perform an Unknown Trash Discharge as a 2-for-1, a 3-for-1, and so forth.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • (This is almost exactly the same as the previous example.)
    • All the 1's are played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues red to Cathy, touching a red 1 on slot 2 and a red 5 on slot 3. The red 1 is focused. This looks like a Play Clue on the red 1.
    • Bob knows that this must be an Unknown Trash Discharge, so he blind-plays his Third Finesse Position. It is a blue 2 and it successfully plays.
    • Cathy knows that a Discharge has occurred from Alice's red clue. This must be an Unknown Trash Discharge, so the focus of the clue must be trash.
    • Cathy marks her slot 2 card as a red 1 (since that is the only possible trash red card) and discards it.
    • Cathy also knows that non-focused cards touched in an Unknown Trash Discharge are supposed to be useful. Thus, Cathy marks her slot 3 card as a red 2, a red 3, a red 4, or a red 5.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobBlue 2Cathy(1)After Bob blind plays blue 2...CathyTrashRed 2Red 3Red 4Red 5