Ejections

  • An Ejection refers to a Signal Shift blind-play in which someone plays an unrelated card from their Second Finesse Position.
    • For example, if a player's hand is completely unclued, their Second Finesse Position is slot 2.
  • Just like a Bluff, an Ejection can only be performed on the very next player.

The 5 Color Ejection#

  • The 5 Color Ejection is covered at level 15.
  • This results in a Signal Shift from Play --> Save.

Trash Push Ejection#

  • First, see the section on the Trash Push.
  • Normally, when known trash is touched as the focus of the clue, and the known trash is on chop, it communicates a Trash Push.
  • However, what if the Trash Pushed card is two-or-more-away-from-playable? This would normally be a Trash Push Double Finesse on Bob, but that is unlikely.
  • Instead, since no single play could ever prevent the Pushed card from immediately misplaying, Bob interprets the clue as an Ejection.
  • After a Trash Push Ejection, the clue receiver should Chop Move the two-or-more-away-from-playable card.

The Bad Chop Move Ejection (with a Trash Chop Move)#

  • Normally, when known trash is touched as the focus of the clue, and the known trash is not on chop, it communicates a Trash Chop Move.
  • However, what if the Chop Moved cards are also all trash? The other players can see that this clue must have some other purpose.
  • In this situation, it should signal an Ejection on the very next player.
  • This results in a Signal Shift from Save --> Trash.
  • Bad Chop Move Ejection can be performed throughout the game. (But keep in mind that in the End-Game, a player might just be stalling.)

The Bad Chop Move Ejection (with 5's)#

  • First, see the section on Bad Chop Move Ejection (with a Trash Chop Move).
  • Normally, if a player performs a 5's Chop Move on a trash card, it would signal a Finesse on all of the cards leading up to the 5.
  • If the very next player sees that they would have to blind-play one card in their hand to fulfill the Finesse, then they should assume that it is a Finesse.
  • If the very next player sees that they would have to blind-play two or more cards in their hand to fulfill the Finesse, then a Finesse is unlikely. Instead, players agree that this signals an Ejection and that the next player should play their Second Finesse Position.
  • After the Ejection, the player receiving the 5 clue will knows that they have trash on their chop.
  • For example, in a 5-player game:
    • It is the Mid-Game and all of the 2's are played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues number 5 to Cathy, touching a blue 5 on slot 3.
    • Cathy's slot 4 card is a red 1. (This was her chop prior to the number 5 clue being given.)
    • It is now Bob's turn. Bob knows that since Alice number 5 clue kind of looks like a 5's Chop Move, since the 5 is exactly one-away-from-chop. However, since it would be Chop Moving a trash card, it can't be that.
    • Bob next assumes that this is simply a Play Clue on the blue 5. That would mean that someone has the blue 3 and the blue 4.
    • Bob's hand is completely unclued. Furthermore, Bob does not see the blue 3 or the blue 4 anywhere else, so he would have to have both of them in his hand. Bob knows that similar to a 5 Color Ejection, a Bad Chop Move Ejection should take precedence if he is supposed to play two or more blind cards.
    • Thus, Bob blind-plays his Second Finesse Position. It is a green 3 and successfully plays.
    • Cathy knows that if this was a 5's Chop Move, then Bob would not have blind-played anything. If it was a Finesse, then Bob would have blind-played his Finesse Position. Since he blind-played his Second Finesse Position card, this must be a Bad Chop Move Ejection and her slot 4 card must be trash.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobGreen 3Cathy5Blue 5Red 1ktDonaldEmilymid game

The Rank Choice Ejection (with a number 2 or a number 5) (RCE)#

  • Typically, when a number 2 clue or a number 5 clue is performed on a chop card, it will be treated as a 2 Save or a 5 Save and the card will not play.
  • If a player performs a 2 Save or a 5 Save on a playable card and they could have easily used a normal color Play Clue, this is quite strange. They must be trying to communicate something extra.
  • In this situation, they intend for an Ejection on the very next player.
  • This results in a Signal Shift from Save --> Play.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Red 1 is played on the stacks.
    • Cathy's hand is completely unclued and is, from newest to oldest: blue 3, blue 3, blue 4, blue 4, red 2
    • Alice clues number 2 to Cathy, touching the red 2 as a 2 Save.
    • Bob sees that the obvious clue to give to Cathy was red, as it would actually get the red 2 played right now.
    • This move is so bad that it must be communicating something extra. Alice must be intending for a Rank Choice Ejection. Bob blind-plays his Second Finesse Position card and it is a blue 1 and successfully plays.
    • Cathy knows that since a number 2 clue cause Bob to blind-play his Second Finesse Position, this must be an Ejection. The only type of Ejection that matches this kind of clue is a Rank Choice Ejection, so Cathy knows that her 2 must be playable and that her 2 must be exactly the red 2. Cathy plays the red 2.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobBlue 1CathyBlue 3Blue 3Blue 4Blue 42Red 2r2
  • More examples of a Rank Choice Ejection can be found here.

The Trash Ejection#

  • First, see the section on the Trash Double Ignition.
  • In certain situations, if a player re-clues a card that is globally known as trash, it triggers a Trash Double Ignition.
  • However, what if the next player can see that a Trash Double Ignition is impossible? In this situation, if the clue-giver is not making a mistake, they instead intend for an Ejection on the very next player.

The Replay Ejection#

  • First, see the section on the Replay Double Ignition.
  • Normally, if a player re-clues a card that is globally known as playable, it triggers a Replay Double Ignition.
  • However, what if the next player can see that a Replay Double Ignition is impossible? In this situation, if the clue-giver is not making a mistake, they instead intend for an Ejection on the very next player.
  • In most circumstances, Replay Ejections can not be performed by re-cluing a card in Bob's hand. This is because Bob would interpret it as a Fix Clue, meaning that the card that Bob was about to play is actually bad and that he should discard it instead of playing it.
  • Note that the Replay Ejection is "turned off" in the End-Game. (This is because players often clue playable cards as a Burn Clue.)

The Poke Ejection#

  • First, see the section on the Poke Double Ignition.
  • Normally, if a player re-clues globally known trash, it triggers a Poke Double Ignition.
  • However, what if the next player can see that a Poke Double Ignition is impossible? In this situation, if the clue-giver is not making a mistake, they instead intend for an Ejection on the very next player.

The Self Color Ejection#

  • First, see the section on the Self Color Double Bluff.
  • Normally, when a card is "filled in" a card that is two-or-more-away-from-playable, it triggers a Self Color Double Bluff.
  • However, what if the next player can see that a Double Bluff is impossible? In this situation, they instead intend for an Ejection on the very next player.
  • For example, in a 4-player game:
    • All the 1's are played on the stacks.
    • Bob has a green 4 in his hand that was previously clued with a number 4 clue.
    • Alice clues green to Bob, which fills in the green 4.
    • Bob considers what the clue means:
      • Normally, this would be a Play Clue on the green 4, calling for a green 2 and a green 3 to be played as a Finesse. However, Bob does not see green 2 and green 3 in anyone else's hands. It also cannot be in his hand (because he has negative green on his entire hand).
      • If it isn't a Finesse, then it must be a Self Color Bluff. However, Self Color Bluffs are only performed on legal Bluff-Targets (e.g. one-away-from-playable cards), and the green 4 is two-away-from-playable.
      • If it isn't a Self Color Bluff, then it must be a Self Color Double Bluff. However, Bob sees that Cathy has a trash card on her Finesse Position. If he blind-plays his Finesse Position, Cathy will go on to misplay her Finesse Position. That means that a Self Color Double Bluff does not make sense.
      • If it isn't a Self Color Double Bluff, then it must be a Self Color Ejection.
    • Bob blind-plays his Second Finesse Position. It is a red 2 and it successfully plays.
    • Cathy does nothing; no other cards are promised.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobRed 2CathyGreen 1Donald