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Charms

  • A Charm refers to a blind-play in which someone plays an unrelated card from their Fourth Finesse Position. For example, if a player's hand is completely unclued, their Fourth Finesse Position is slot 4.
  • Charms fall outside of the Signal Shift framework. Instead, playing from Fourth Finesse Position is required in order to disambiguate the clue from being a Finesse, Ejection, or Discharge.
  • Just like a Bluff, a Charm can only be performed on the very next player.

The 4 Charm

Interaction with Double Bluffs Where Cathy Has a One-Away-From-Playable Card

  • As stated in the level 22 section, Double Bluffs have precedence over 4 Charms. However, there is one small exception.
  • Double Bluffs do not have precedence in the situation where Bob sees that Cathy has a one-away-from-playable card on her Finesse Position. Here, it is technically possible that Bob will blind-play the exact card that makes Cathy's Finesse Position playable. But since this is so unlikely, we agree that players in this situation should revert to a 4 Charm interpretation.
  • For example, in a 4-player game:
    • Red 1 is played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues blue to Donald, touching a blue 4 as a Play Clue. (Blue 4 is currently three-away-from-playable.)
    • Bob sees that Cathy has a red 3 on her Finesse Position.
    • If Bob has exactly a red 2 on his Finesse Position, then he knows that Alice's clue would work as a 4's Double Bluff.
    • However, since the red 3 on Cathy's Finesse Position is one-away-from-playable, Bob knows that 4 Charms should take precedence.
    • Bob blind-plays his Fourth Finesse Finesse card. It is a red 2 and successfully plays on the stacks.

Interaction with the Out-of-Order Finesse

  • First, see the section on the Out-of-Order Finesse.
  • The Out-of-Order Finesse always takes precedence over a 4 Charm or a 4's Double Bluff, because of Bob's Truth Principle.
  • For example, in a 4-player game:
    • It is the first turn and nothing is played on the stacks.
    • Donald's hand is as follows, from left to right: red 4, red 1, blue 3, blue 3
    • Alice clues red to Donald, touching the red 4 on slot 1 and the red 1 on slot 2. This is a Play Clue.
    • Bob knows that this could be the truth as an Out-of-Order Finesse. If that is the case, he should clue number 4 to Donald, allowing him to play the red 1. Then, Bob can blind-play the red 2 and the red 3 (into the playable red 4).
    • Bob knows that this could also be a 4 Charm, since the red 4 is three-away-from-playable and Bob does not see any other red cards on Finesse Position.
    • However, Bob knows that he should always assume the truth over a lie, so he assumes that Alice intends for an Out-of-Order Finesse.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobCathyDonaldfirst turn

The Unknown Trash Charm (UTC)

  • First, see the section on the Unknown Trash Discharge.
  • Normally, after an Unknown Trash Discharge, non-focused cards are known to be "good".
  • However, what if a player performs an Unknown Trash Discharge where all of the non-focused cards are trash? A Discharge would incorrectly signal that the non-focused cards are useful.
  • Instead, this should signal a Charm on the very next player.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • All of the 2's are played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues red to Cathy, touching a red 1 on slot 1 and a red 2 on slot 2.
    • Normally, Bob would treat this clue as an Unknown Trash Discharge. However, if he Discharges, then Cathy will discard the red 1 and mark the red 2 as either a red 3, a red 4, or a red 5, which would be a Lie.
    • Instead, Bob knows that this signals an Unknown Trash Charm, so he blind-plays his Fourth Finesse Position. It is a blue 3 and it successfully plays.
AliceClue GiverClue GiverBobBlue 3CathyRed 1Red 2

The Junk Charm (for 1's)

  • Sometimes, when giving a number 1 Play Clue for 1's, a Bad Touch is unavoidable. But what if a player does this when a color clue would have avoided a Bad Touch?
  • If all the non-focused 1's are trash, the clue must be calling for something extra - a Charm on the very next player.
  • After the Charm occurs, the clued player will know that only the focus of the 1's clue is playable.
  • For example, in a 3-player game:
    • Green 1 is played on the stacks.
    • Alice clues number 1 to Cathy, touching a red 1 on slot 5 and a green 1 on slot 2.
    • Cathy's hand is, from newest to oldest: yellow 2, green 1, blue 3, purple 5, red 1
    • Bob can see that Alice could have clued red to only touch the red 1 and avoid a Bad Touch.
    • Bob knows that this signals a blind-play:
      • A Finesse Position blind-play would look like a Trash Finesse, which would be a Lie.
      • A Second Finesse Position blind-play would look like a Trash Push Ejection, which would be a Lie.
      • A Third Finesse Position blind-play would look like a Junk Discharge, which would be a Lie.
    • Thus, Bob knows this must be a Junk Charm and blind-plays his Fourth Finesse Position. It is a blue 1 and it successfully plays.